Meet Your New Editors!

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shilpi

Shilpi Pathak (WG’17), Editor-In-Chief

Shilpi was born and raised in Mumbai, India. Growing up, she enjoyed writing poetry and short stories. Her favorite activity was journaling about the world and its workings. Her passion for writing led her to pursue writing for short films in a small production house in Mumbai. She was also responsible for reinstating the school magazine, which had long been forgotten, in her undergraduate school in Mumbai University.

As the Director of Content for The Wharton Journal, she worked on sourcing content that provided an honest perspective to our community, allowing students to represent their true voice at Wharton. As the new editor-in-chief, Shilpi envisions The Journal will play a more active part in raising issues that are central to the MBA community. She believes that perspectives need to be expressed in their original voice, so that they can expand our minds, question our thinking, and motivate us to contribute positively to our community.

 

euri

Euri Son (WG’17), Editor-In-Chief

Euri was raised in South Korea, and spent three years in Texas from age 9-12. She majored Journalism in college and pursued acareer as a daily newspaper reporter in Seoul. After years of covering major events in Korea, such as the presidential election and the legal battle between Samsung and Apple, she strongly felt the desire to find the intersection point between quality content and sustainable business model in the floundering industry.

She worked as the Director of Digital Media for The Wharton Journal, managing the online content and weekly newsletter to make sure everyone could access the content in the digital environment. As the new editor-in-chief, Euri wants the paper to be an effective channel that enhances deep communications within the Wharton Community, a trusted platform where the students can voice their perspectives, and a clear window through which the outsiders can get a glimpse of the Wharton life and people.

 

SAMSUNG CSC

Sho Shetty (WG’17), Executive Editor

Sho was born and raised in Palm Beach, Florida. Majoring in Government and Economics at Harvard, he spent the past few years at a boutique consulting firm in Washington D.C., serving firms operating in government-driven markets. Growing up, he never had a particularly strong affinity for writing (although he does do the annual “Draft Summary” write up for all of his various fantasy football/baseball leagues), but he certainly has a deep appreciation for the art. He is looking forward to working on The Journal to cultivate a new interest and dive deep into one of those stretch experiences we hear so much about in our two years here at Wharton.

As Executive Editor for The Wharton Journal, Sho will help identify potential stories and perspectives. As an avid reader of the periodical, he’s looking forward to contributing to its success in the coming year. And, as someone admittedly less “journalistic,” he hopes to provide some unique contributions to the Board’s discussions and vision for The Journal.

 

jeff

Jeffrey Jose (WG’17), Digital Editor

Jeffrey grew up in Kerala, a state in the south of India well known for backwaters and tropical climates. He started programming at the age of 10, and built ICs with diodes and microcontrollers growing up – a passion he took to BITS Pilani where he majored in Electrical and Electronics Engineering.

Prior to Wharton, Jeffrey worked at DreamWorks Animation where he was a Lead Technical Director on movies, and a Product Manager for Studio Tools. While seeing his name on the big screen on movies such as How To Train Your Dragon 2, Madagascar 3 (and few others) was always a thrill, he derives greater happiness in making servers run blazingly fast and websites look pixel perfect.

As the Director of Special Projects for The Wharton Journal, Jeffrey helped put together off-beat pieces for the paper this past several months. He’s convinced that key to making The Journal relevant again is to go online-first. Look out for web-only pieces such as interactive graphs/infographics and “The Big Picture” style posts.

 

Q: What is your goal for next year as the leaders of The Wharton Journal?

Shilpi: To make The Wharton Journal a more inclusive platform, representing views of all stakeholders of the community. I want to ensure that every person feels well-represented and every issue is explored.

Euri: If you translate the word “reporter” in Korean, it is “Gi-ja,” which means “a person who records.” I think the collection of The Wharton Journals is a storehouse of valuable records, a treasure chest of events and perspectives that we’ve shared in our time. My goal is to dig out the gemstones and turn them into diamonds by recording them.

Sho: My goal is to bring the casual audience into the fold. I want to experiment with pieces and perspectives to see how we can best reflect what our community wants to read about.

Jeff: Web offers us a chance to rethink journalism and reporting. Imagine the possibilities when we make The Wharton Journal’s online presence a first-class citizen, rather than an after thought.

 

Q: What has been your best and worst moment of your Wharton experience so far?

Shilpi: My favorite moment was when I was introduced to my Learning Team on the golf course in Delaware! Writing songs and building helicopter models on that day, we had no idea that those were some of our most creative moments. (We should have saved some creativity for the Marketing case studies!)

The worst moment was my first coffee chat – I thought it would be deep conversations over a cup of cappuccino, I was so unprepared to sell myself over coffee!

Euri: Best: The Media trek! I loved both the LA and the NYC trek. It was mind-dazzling to actually visit the companies that I’ve merely imagined back in Korea.

Worst: The first day of Q2… After a coffee chat and two EISs straight in a row, I just realized that I had no idea what I wanted to do.

Sho: Besides getting in, my best moment has been working with a member of my Learning Team with her business. It meant the world that someone trusted me with their idea when we just a few months earlier. The worst moment was when Wharton got bumped to #4. And by Booth of all places. I mean, c’mon man, really?

Jeff: My favorite moment has to be traveling with 120 other classmates to Colombia during Thanksgiving. There was something about walking at night in Cartegena bumping into classmates as if I were in Rittenhouse Square.

The worst has to be trying to wish away the recruiting days. When your days start appearing longer than usual, normally its a sign that something isnt going right. Luckily for the majority of the Wharton community, those days are behind us.

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